Monday, July 30, 2018

Maine 2018

We did a short stay in Wells, Maine for 3 nights.  Like that area but so hard to get a spot to camp.  It is a great place to get some of the best lobster rolls, for the best price, we have found.  We got parked, plugged in, slides out and headed for Shaine's of Maine.  Suppose to have great ice cream but it is the lobster roll and clam chowder we go for.  Next afternoon we were out doing some sight seeing and stopped at a restaurant on the coast where we had gone in the past.  This time we tried the Haddock sandwich, it was actually some of the best haddock we have had, good size piece of fish and so flaky.  Next day it was lobster roll time again at Shaine's.








We also went to the Seashore Trolley Museum. It is the largest one of it kind in the US. Sure was fun to see all the old trolleys for all around the world. I remember ridding on some of these kinds in San Francisco when I was a kid. Even got to ride on one of the old Trolleys.
























We have now moved onto Trenton, Maine.  Second night here it was more lobster (wish I liked lobster) at the Down East Lobster Pound. Our friends Lily and Ian joined us.  The view from the outside upper deck is amazing.  Another day we went to the local IGA grocery store and Len bought two lobsters, he grilled those and really enjoyed them.





Today we caught the local free bus and headed to the Villages of Bar Harbor, from there we transferred to the bus that takes you to Arcadia National Park.  Today was the busiest day, according to the bus driver, that he has seen this season.  We rode the loop around the park and will return in the truck and get a closer look at some of the areas we would like to see.  We transferred back to the Village bus and once back  at the Village we walked around.  Stopped for a snack and cold beer, before we wandered through some of the stores with all the other tourist that were in town.  One of the big cruise ships was in port so that made for more people also.

Will be here another week and half so will add more later...…















Friday, July 20, 2018

Timothy Lake South, E. Stroudsburg. PA 06/2018



                             CLICK HERE FOR PICTURES OF THE AREA


Have been to this park before but it is always a nice stay.

Played bingo one afternoon, Len was the lucky winner and got to yell BINGO twice.  The  blackout got him a great prize, it was two tickets to the Oktoberfest.  We had talked about going so this did make the decision to go a bit easier.  Was disappointed there were so few vendors participating. More food vendors than anything.  They did have several bands and some dancers, crowd was small.  Enjoyed the pig races which were fun to watch and some dog races were included.  Entertainment for the kids was also fun there was a juggler, a magician and lots of games for the kids.  We did enjoy a great brats with caramelized onions while we were there.

Took a ride to check out Resica Falls which is situated in the beautiful Pocono Mountains.  Short walk to see the falls from the parking lot, nice little water fall.  This is located on a Boy Scout Reservation that is still very active.

Made another trip to the Pocono raceway, last time was so much fun we wanted to do it again.  During the drive there the rain came down in buckets, would there be a rain delay?  Rain did let up some by the time we arrived.  I had called in advance and was told we would be riding with another couple, didn't think that would be a problem as the last time we also rode with another couple.  When we arrived we didn't see the pace car like last time but instead a 14 passenger van, you know a van on a race track is nothing like a pace car ride on the track.  Plus the couple turned out to be 7 family members with one little one that wasn't the least bit interested in the ride along and "voiced" his opinion several times, in fact his family apologized and said he is usually a happy go lucky baby.  Guess it just wasn't his day.  The rain continued during our track tour but did make a stop at the finish line for pictures. 

We did visit the casino a couple of times, I mean we were driving right pass it.  Both times we managed to leave a little there, nothing like sharing.

Will be in Maine soon, sure looking forward to our visit there.

More to follow................


Saturday, July 7, 2018

Hershey RV Park, July 2018



                                  CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES OF THE AREA


We have had a great time here at Hershey for the last three weeks.  High temps along with high humidity has kept us inside a lot, along with some rains, heavy at times and a flash flood alert one night.  It is still easy to find indoor things to explore.  Some areas we have revisited but also found some new places that we haven't been to before.

We visited AACA museum (Antique Automobile Club of America). The Mustang Exhibit opened in May so the showroom floors will filled with Mustangs, along with other old cars, buses and a display of an old filling station that even had the air hose to call for an attendant to fill you tank, wash your windshield, and check your tires and oil.  This was our first time here and really enjoyed our visit.  Also on display was the Tucker auto, Preston Tucker was way ahead of the game in automobiles I think, but just couldn't make it. Only 51 cars were ever made, before the operations ceased due to negative publicity initiated by the news media, and a Security and Exchange Commission investigation, along with stock fraud, which were proven to false.  Down in their basement they have the best miniature railroad set up, along with the little towns.  You push a button and the car wash runs a car through, push another button and the tire swings starts.  While you are doing all this you are pushing buttons to make several different trains run and pothers things on display work Think the adults were enjoying just as much as the kids, if not more.


Also a new stop for us was the Zoo America Wildlife Park. They have more than 200 animals from 5 distinct areas of North America.  The zoo began in 1905 with an exhibit of prairie dogs.  In 1910 it opened with exotic animals, in 1970 a major transformation happened exhibiting only North America animals, this also including many rescue animals.


Took a drive to Lancaster one day, this is an Amish area.  When we visited before we took a bus tour from the information center, it wasn't available this year but we were given a map of the route.  I wanted to stop at the Country Store where we had stopped on our last visit.  They make the best sugar-free apple butter.  Their store is filled with local homemade items that are for sale.  Couldn't leave without a fresh baked pretzel either. The store has great ice cream but we were headed for another stop and ice cream so passed on it. While in the area we also drove to the town of Bird-In-Hand and Intercourse, how do these towns get named?  We headed to the Turkey Hill Experience, don't feel it was as good as our last visit but if you aren't full of ice cream when you leave, it's your own fault.  Veterans get free admission but I had to pay $9.50 for my "experience". It was a self-guided tour explaining the process, I milked a "cow", we saw a short film on the ice cream making process, created our own flavors via a computer.  We were even get an opportunity to help with sampling of ice cream products that they are thinking of marketing.  Onto the  ice cream tasting.  They had about 5 samples you could taste, we did 3 or 4 of them.  They were good but I think Hershey Ice Cream was better. They also had several flavors of the Iced Tea they make, some were better than others, must of been 6 flavors to sample.


Visited Chocolate World (Hershey).  Took the ride to see how the candy it made which is animated but a cute ride.  After the ride you get a little chocolate bar.  Wondered through the gift shop, so mush to look at.  Passed on buying the candy and that wasn't even a hard thing to do, I was surprised.  You can do a lot there but everything is a charge and since we had been before we were OK to pass on it.

Drove to Harrisburg to visit The National Civil War Museum, another place we have visited but don't mind returning to most of the museums we have seen before.  Got there shortly after they opened and the place was deserted so was able to explore one floor and was almost done with it before we ran into anyone else.  History is shown on Slavery, Making of the Armies, Medicine, Life-Like Exhibits, even a soldier's campsite.  Over 4,000 artifacts and 21,000 archival documents.  After the Battle of Gettysburg, 37,574 rifles were recovered and sent to Washington to be reissued.

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Cheasapeake Bay Thousand Trails, Gloocester, VA June 2018

                               CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES OF THE AREA




Our first time to this RV park and some new things to see.

We visited the American Revolution Museum, been in the area before and visited the other museum but the new one is so much nicer.
The American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, which replaces the Yorktown Victory Center, achieved a crucial milestone with the new museum opening April 2017.
Through comprehensive, immersive indoor exhibits and outdoor living history, the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown offers a truly national perspective, conveying a sense of the transformational nature and epic scale of the Revolution and the richness and complexity of the country’s Revolutionary heritage. 
In the 170-seat museum theater, “Liberty Fever” draws visitors into the world of Revolutionary America, setting the stage for indoor gallery and outdoor living-history experiences. The introductory film is narrated by an early 19th-century storyteller who has traveled the country gathering stories about the American Revolution and shares his accounts using a moving panorama presentation of the time period.
The 22,000-square-foot permanent exhibition galleries engage visitors in the tumult, drama and promise of the Revolution through period artifacts and immersive environments, dioramas, interactive exhibits and short films, including an experiential theater that transports visitors to the Siege of Yorktown with wind, smoke and the thunder of cannon fire.

Spent an afternoon at the Rosewell Ruins, sad to see the conditions of the ruins. This massive home, considered among the most extravagant of its kind, was built in 1725 for the Page Family. The Page family sought to build a home that would exceed the luxury and stature of the Governor's own palace in Williamsburg. In its entirety, the house stood at 12,000 square feet, which doubled the size of the palace.  Rosewell saw its ups and downs as the country developed, and even throughout economic hardships brought on by the Civil War, the site was known for hosting lavish parties and dances. In 1916, a tragic fire swept through the house and demolished all but what remains today: a few brick columns and the bare bones of a building from another time.

We visited the Virginia Institute of Marine Science to check out their small Aquarium. It was a free visit with some amazing displays.

From the aquarium we drove down to Gloucester Point Beach Park.  Several people were crabbing and fishing off the pier.  Gloucester Point experiences diurnal tides - meaning that on a normal day , two low and two high tides occur.

Len did take the bike out for a ride one morning before it got too warm.  Temps have been high but along with that comes the humidity.

While in the park we have played bingo a couple of time, no wins but Len did get a candy bar at the last bingo cause it was father's day weekend so all the dad's got a candy bar.  Also went to breakfast on Sunday morning, first time we had a coupon from the membership meeting for a free pancake breakfast and today the dad's got a free pancake breakfast.  Guess I don't have to tell you we have walked over to the little store and gotten ice cream, hey it's hot here and you need to stay cool. Servings are large so the kiddie size is more than enough.  Did play a round of mini golf while we were here, very nice little course, best part, is I beat Len and that never happens.  I did win a $50. gift card at the membership meeting, so that was nice.

Tomorrow we head onto our next adventure in Hershey, PA, I can smell the chocolate already, till next time........

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Lake Gaston, Littleton, NC June 2018

We are ending our 2 week stay here at Lake Gaston, in Littleton, North Carolina.  We have seen a lot of rain during our stay here, but managed to get out and see a few things in the area.

We drove to Historical Halifax for some sight  seeing.  Started at the visitor center, viewed their short film on the area and then were taken via golf cart to some of the historical buildings in the area. Located on the Roanoke River, the town of Halifax developed into a commercial and political center at the time of the American Revolution. North Carolina's Fourth Provincial Congress met in Halifax in the spring of 1776. On April 12 that body unanimously adopted a document later called the "Halifax Resolves," which was the first official action by an entire colony recommending independence from England. The tour of the site includes several authentically restored and furnished buildings including the 1838 Jail, the 1790 Eagle Tavern and the Underground Railroad Trail. Historic Halifax frequently features costumed historical interpreters and craft demonstrations that bring the early history of the Roanoke Valley to life.

Another day we drove into the small town of Littleton to visit the Cryptozoology and Paranormal Museum, it was a very interesting stop.  This area is well know for sightings of Big Foot, while we didn't see any we enjoyed the casted foot prints in the museum along with the pictures.  Check out their on line information. https://crypto-para.org/


Len took a ride to the hydro dam on Lake Gaston, it is a hydroelectric reservoir in the eastern U.S. Part of the lake is in the North Carolina counties of Halifax, Northampton and Warren. The part extending into Virginia lies in Brunswick and Mecklenburg counties. Lake Gaston is roughly 35 miles long and covers over 20,000 acres, with 350 miles shoreline.
The area surrounding the lake is home to more than 150,000 residents.
The lake is not federally owned. It was formed when the Virginia Electric Power Company (VEPCO) built Gaston Dam on the Roanoke River to generate electricity for Dominion Resources, which owns the lake. The dam is located on the North Carolina side and generates electricity for Dominion North Carolina Power, which is the North Carolina operating company of Dominion Resources. The dam includes four hydroelectric generators, with a total generating capacity of 224 megawatts.
Lake Gaston was built for flood control, hydroelectric power and recreational enjoyment, including activities such as fishing, boating, swimming, water skiing and wakeboarding.
The lake has been a popular retirement destination since the 1970s.  Len did take his kayak out one day on the lake.

This park was very busy over Memorial Day Weekend.  I did participate in their craft fair, did make a few sales also.

We played bingo one night and managed to break even. 

So tomorrow we move onto Chesapeake Bay RV Park in Gloucester, Virginia, we have not been to this park before so looking forward to more adventures. 

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Twin Lakes Campground, Chocowinity, N.C.



                                 CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES OF THE AREA


First time staying here so a new area to explore. We took a drive to Goose Creek State Park, after a visit to the visitor center, we took a walk on the boardwalk. Goose Creek is a haven for birds.  We saw a snake, and lots of turtles plus a few other creatures.  This park is over 1,600 acres. There is no charge to visit any of North Carolina state parks, wish all states were like that.






One afternoon we drove to downtown Washington, not far from the campground. Our first stop was the Underground railroad, so much to learn and understand. The volunteer was amazing and her telling of the history held your attention. Think we would still be there, but had an appointment with a boat.







We ventured on to our next stop.  The North Carolina Estuarium, this place tells all about the estuaries that are formed where fresh water and salt water mix together. North Carolina has more estuarine waters than any other state.  We checked out their exhibits before taking the hour and half boat ride on the Pamlico and Tar river.  Even got to see an eagle.







While on the boat ride we were told about a local hot dog joint that has been in business for 90 years. All they serve is not dogs with their secret  chili sauce, mustard and onions.  They sure were good, in fact we did go back for another meal.


Drove over to historical Bath, the visitor center had a display for Edward  Teach/Thatch, better know as Blackbeard the pirate. He lived here and died in
Ocracoke, Province of NC. In 1718. Also drove around Bath and checked out the historic sites and some of the remaining houses and churches.





Our last week here has been a little rainy but happy we were able to visit this area and add more history to our travels.


Sunday, May 6, 2018

The Oaks at Point South, Yemassee, South Carolina



                         CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES OF OUR STAY HERE


Trying to get caught up here with my "chores".  We were at the Oaks for 10 days and kept pretty busy. 

Our first outing took us to Patriots Point in Mt. Pleasant, SC.
Patriots Point Naval  Maritime Museum is located in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, at the mouth of the Cooper River on the Charleston Harbor, across from Charleston. This is home to the USS Yorktown along with the destroyer, USS Laffey, submarine, and USS Clamagore, also included The Vietnam Experience that uses state-of-the-art technology and artifacts to immerse visitors in what it was like to be in Vietnam.  Len toured all of the ships that day.  I had posted on face book some pictures and heard back from Bev that I worked with when my boys were young.  She said we were close to her and Mike's place to stop by, she was still working but Mike was home. They ended up taking us out to a local restaurant, See Wee, for supper, enjoyed some great shrimp and southern sides.

We also visited Fort Moultrie while in the area.  It tells the story of two centuries of seacoast defense, this Fort is on Sullivan Island. Between 1809 and 1860 the fort changed little, it was modernized in the 1870's.

Also made a stop at Hunting Island State Park. We have visited this lighthouse before but Len  climber the 175 steps to the top for some beautiful views. The original lighthouse was built 1857-1859, it was destroyed in 1861 by Confederates so that the Union couldn't use the light against them. 1873 started rebuilding, completed in 1875. 1889 the ocean began knocking at it's door, so it was dismantled and moved 1 1/4 miles. In 1933 the lens was decommissioned, in 1938 the light keeper's house was burned down during the occupation by the CCC. Currently the lighthouse has a functional light in the tower only visible 5 miles out and flashes at a 30-second interval, it is not used for navigation.

We took at drive into Savannah on two different occasions.  Had toured the area via a trolley when here before so learned the history at that time.  This time we ventured out on our own with the free city bus, our first stop was Johnson Square, from there we walked down to the Savannah River, caught the free ferry and took a trip down the river, it made a stop at the convention center and then before we were able to cruise back out on the river had to wait for a big cargo ship to pass.  Next stop was at Morrell park where the waving girl statue is.  Len departed the boat at this stop and walked back up the river walk while I took the ferry back to the starting point.  It was lunch time so decided to find Paula Dean's restaurant.  Len did the buffet and enjoyed what he ate, I ordered off the menu and wasn't happy at all with my chicken salad or cole slaw, the banana pudding was good.

Another day it was a visit to Fort Pulaski, this fort was built to guard the river approaches to Savannah, GA. Still has a moat and drawbridge. The 7 1/2 foot walls were demolished by Union rifled artillery on April 10-11, 1862. One wall still shows the craters made by cannon shot fired from Tybee Island, penetrated the walls 20-25 inches.  Some of the 5,275 shots fired can still be seen in the walls.

Then it was a stop at Wormsloe State Historic Site, it is a 1736 Colonial Estate. At the entrance gate is a picturesque roadway leading through the property that is lined with more than 400 live oak trees that were planted in the early 1890's. On the tour you also see a colonial life area and living history camps.

Had Mike and Bev over to the motorhome for lunch on Saturday, it was good to get a chance to visit with them once again before leaving the area.



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